3 Delightful Cascading Textured Stitches to Try When You’re Tired of Garter

Need to try a different sort of knitting stitch for afghan squares, scarves, or dishcloths? Try one of these fun cascading stitches that offer wonderful texture

I sometimes fall asleep while I’m knitting.

No, really… I do!

One reason I love knitting is because it’s so relaxing. Nothing puts me in a more comforting state of mind than sitting with my yarn and needles.

But sometimes… I find myself so relaxed that I fall asleep!

Can you guess what I’m usually knitting when that happens? If you answered, “garter or stockinette stitch,” ring that bell because you are correct.

The perfect antidote to such an issue is a fun textured stitch that requires a bit more brain power than garter or stockinette. Below are three such “antidotes” that you’ll love using for any flat work (and even a few circular projects)!

Abbreviations for All Stitch Patterns

K: Knit

P: Purl

YO: Yarn over (wrap the yarn around your right needle)

K2tog: Knit 2 together

P2tog: Purl 2 together

Instructions for 3 Fabulous Cascading Stitches

1. Zigzag

Zigzag stitch
Photo: Eric Haschke

This is a fun yet simple pattern that creates a matching set of zigzag lines; you can repeat it as often as you wish.

Cast on a multiple of 19. If you’re using this for flat knitting, you may want to also cast on border stitches on either side.

Row 1: Purl.

Row 2: *K1, P1, K7, P1, K7, P1, K1, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 3: *P2, K1, P5, K1, P1, K1, P5, K1, P2, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 4: *(K3, P1) 4 times, K3, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 5: *P4, K1, P1, K1, P5, K1, P1, K1, P4, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 6: *K1, P1, (K3, P1) 4 times, K1, repeat from * to end of row.

Row 7: Repeat Row 2.

Row 8: Repeat Row 3.

Row 9: Repeat Row 4.

Row 10: K5, P1, K7, P1, K5.

Repeat these 10 rows until your work is as long as you wish. You may also end your work after Row 5, if you wish.

2. Waterfalls

This creates a fun cascading effect with laces and mock cables. It will also get a certain TLC song stuck in your head. (Come on, you were thinking it too!)

Waterfalls stitch
Photo: Eric Haschke

Cast on a multiple of 6 plus 3. Again, if you’re using this pattern on a flat work, you’ll want to cast on additional border stitches on either side.

Row 1: P3, *K3, YO, P3, repeat from * until end of row.

Row 2: K3, *P4, K3, repeat from * until end of row.

Row 3: P3, *K1, K2tog, YO, K1, P3, repeat from * until end of row.

Row 4: K3, *P2, P2tog, K3, repeat from * until end of row.

Row 5: P3, *K1, YO, K2tog, P3, repeat from * until end of row.

Row 6: K3, *P3, K3, repeat from * until end of row.

Repeat these 6 rows until your work is as long as you wish.

3. Box Weave

I love this stitch because it goes beyond a basic box stitch with a little bit of added texture.

Box Weave
Photo: Eric Haschke

The trickiest part is not getting lost, since the first two rows of the pattern repeat are the same as the last two rows–but reversed.

However, as long as you keep track of your rows, this is an extraordinarily easy pattern to memorize!

Cast on a multiple of 5. As always, if you’re knitting a flat project, you’ll want to add border stitches to either side.

Row 1: P1, K4, Repeat.

Row 2: P3, K2, Repeat.

Row 3: Repeat Row 2.

Row 4: Repeat Row 1.

You can see that I’ve tried all 3 of these stitch patterns. I’m proud to say I didn’t fall asleep even once while working these swatches.

Try one or all for fabulous touches to afghan squares (or full blankets, especially baby blankets), scarves, washcloths, and dishcloths!

Want more free knitting patterns for charity? Click here for your copy of “4 Quick Charity Knitting Wins” and start making a difference today!