4 (and More!) Free Toy Knitting Patterns, Perfect for Charity

With small amounts of yarn, these adorable toy knitting patterns will make any child smile

4 free toy knititng patterns

Finding the perfect gift for little ones sometimes feels so elusive. Sure, the trends and advertising will tell you what’s popular with kids.

But how to find a gift that little ones won’t tire of within minutes of receiving it? That’s the real challenge, am I right? That’s why I encourage knitters who love children to consider toy knitting patterns.

Knitted toys make a connection in a way that the latest-and-greatest toy on the market simply can’t. Handmade toys are timeless and often cherished and treasured well beyond their “shelf lives.”

If you’ve ever received something handmade as a child, you know that connection. And chances are good that you either still have it or have already handed it down to your own children. Or a niece, nephew, grandchild…

Fee toy knitting patterns are especially valuable to charity knitters. When you give knitted toys to charities that serve children, they often become cherished friends. A child in a hospital, a shelter, or some other difficult circumstance will treasure that gift forever.

And it’s likely they’ll never forget that someone cared enough to give them a gift they made with their own hands.

The following are free knitting patterns for toys, as gifts or for charity. So many children are bound to love the toys that result. And you’ll have fun knitting them, too!

You’ll find even more toy knitting pattern ideas here!

Easy, Free Toy Knitting Patterns – Great for Charity or Gifts

1. Christmas Cracker Hat/Crown

Here’s a little something I’ve learned during my many years in helping with children’s Sunday school: kids love to play with crowns.

In our classroom, we have two play crowns, one of which once had a liner to actually keep it on someone’s head. That liner has long since disappeared, so it is now entirely too large for anyone’s head, let alone the noggin belonging to a child. That does not keep the crown from being nabbed and worn (even though it always winds up around the kid’s neck) whenever possible.

I’m not completely up-to-date on the whole Christmas cracker tradition (I suspect it’s a UK thing!), but the crown is utterly charming and quite easy to create.

2. Bunny from a Square

knitted toy patterns charity - Knit Bunny from a Square
Knit Bunny from a Square
Photo: Kristen McDonnell of Studio Knits

Want to make toys in a hurry? This bunny whips up in an hour — all you need is a knitted square. The instructions are well explained and easy to follow. Simple enough for novice knitters to finish quickly, but no one will guess when they look at it!

Free Toy Knitting Patterns for Those who like a challenge

Amy Doll - free toy knitting pattern
Amy Doll
Photo: funessa on Ravelry

3. Amy Doll

This is a challenging free knitting pattern for a toy, but how cute is the result? Any young one looking for a friend will love it. It even comes with directions for making booties, diapers, and blankets.

If you love this pattern, be sure to check out the designer’s entire Ravelry page. It’s filled with many more wonderful designs! Any of these free knitting patterns would be great for charity.

free toy knitting patterns charity - hockey player
Knitted Hockey Player
Photo: Jenni Propst

4. Knitted Hockey Player

This is another slightly more complex knitting pattern, but it’s one any hockey lover will adore. As a bonus, this little guy can be customized to fit the team(s) that your little hockey lover loves most.

Designer Jenni has another adorable knitted toy pattern, too: check out her Knitted Pocket Gnome!

Any of these toy knitting patterns will make wonderful gifts or charity donations.

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